Sports Medicine News


Sports Medicine News


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Sports Medicine / Fitness News From Medical News Today
Sports medicine bridges the gap between science and practice in the promotion of exercise and health, and in the scientific assessment, study and understanding of sports performance. Sports medicine covers subjects such as sports injury prevention and treatment, exercise for health, drugs in sport, recommendations for training and nutrition and maximizing peak performance and exercise physiology.

Moving every 30 minutes may help you live longer
Prolonged sitting may raise the risk of early death, but new research suggests that this risk could be offset by getting up and moving every half an hour.
Ten common knee injuries and treatment
The knee is one of the body's more complicated joints and is susceptible to various injuries. Here are ten of the most common knee injuries.
Ledderhose disease: Treatments, diet, and surgery
What is ledderhose disease? What are the symptoms, what are the causes, does diet play a role in the condition and how is it diagnosed?
Exercise may alter men's food choices, but not women's
How does exercise influence diet? According to the results of a new study, the answer may depend on whether you are a man or a woman.
How do muscles work?
Find out how muscles move, how they repair themselves after injury, and why scientists say that antioxidants after exercise might not be good after all.
Boxer's fracture: Treatment, diagnosis, and recovery
A boxer's fracture is a bone fracture that affects knuckles in the hand. In this article, learn about the causes, how it is diagnosed, and treatments.
Dog walkers motivated by happiness, not health
It appears to be a case of 'do what makes you happy' for people who regularly walk their dogs.
How to lose subcutaneous fat: All you need to know
What is subcutaneous fat? In this article, we look at the health impact of subcutaneous fat, what causes it, and how to lose it through exercises and diet.
What is a spiral fracture? Causes and treatment
A spiral fracture is a type of bone fracture. It occurs when a long bone is twisted with force. Learn about the potential symptoms, and how it is treated.
Prolonged sitting and TV watching 'dangerous' for seniors
Insufficient physical activity, combined with excessive TV watching and sedentary behavior, dramatically raises the risk of walking disability in seniors.
Anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit muscle growth
The long-term use of over-the-counter (OTC) anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit muscle growth in young, healthy individuals engaging in weight training, according to a new study from Karolinska...
Dancing may help to combat brain aging
Researchers have found that both strength-endurance training and dancing increased hippocampal volume in the brain, but the latter had the greatest impact.
Brain recovery longer than clinical recovery among athletes following concuss...
University athletes with a recent concussion had changes in their brain structure and function even after they received medical clearance to return to play, a new study has found.
Exercise right after learning improves memory in women
New research suggests that as little as 5 minutes of light exercise immediately after a learning session improves memory in women.
How long does it take to build muscle with exercise?
Performing particular exercises and eating the right foods can help to build muscle over time. In this article, we look at the how long it will take.

Sports Medicine News -- ScienceDaily
Sports medicine. Read the latest research on competitive and recreational sports, including information on the occurrence and treatment of sports injuries.

Jymmin: How a combination of exercise and music helps us feel less pain
Pain is essential for survival. However, it could also slow rehabilitation, or could become a distinct disorder. How strongly we feel it depends on our individual pain threshold. Scientists have discovered that this threshold can be increased by a new fitness method called Jymmin. It combines working out on gym machines with free musical improvisation -- and makes us less sensitive towards physical discomfort.
New device measures blink reflex parameters to quickly and objectively identi...
A new device offers a valid, reliable tool for identifying concussion head injuries, researchers report. Comparing blink reflex parameters in football players suspected of having sustained a concussion to healthy players revealed specific, significant differences. Noninvasive and quick to collect, blink reflex data provide objective support for concussion-related decisions and may be useful in other neurological disorders.
Ball games and circuit strength training boost bone health in schoolchildren
The type of exercise that children get in school does make a difference, according to a major Danish study. Schoolchildren 8 to 10 years old develop stronger bones, increased muscular strength and improved balance when ball games or circuit training are on the timetable.
More efficient method devised to drug test athletes
It will now be easier, faster and cheaper to catch athletes who take performance-enhancing drugs.
Teens need vigorous physical activity and fitness to cut heart risk
Guidelines for teenagers should stress the importance of vigorous physical activity and fitness to cut the risk of heart disease, new research suggests.
Study proves 'muscle memory' exists at a DNA level
A study has shown for the first time that human muscles possess a 'memory' of earlier growth -- at the DNA level.
Caffeine?s sport performance advantage for infrequent tea and coffee drinkers
Sports scientists have found that the performance enhancing benefits of caffeine are more apparent in athletes who do not drink caffeine-rich drinks such as tea, coffee, and energy drinks on a daily basis.
Study ends debate over role of steroids in treating septic shock
The results from the largest ever study of septic shock could improve treatment for critically ill patients and save health systems worldwide hundreds of millions of dollars each year. Researchers studied whether the use of steroids as an additional treatment to septic shock -- a severe life threatening infection -- would improve survival.
Hits, not concussions, cause chronic traumatic encephalopathy
Researchers have identified evidence of early Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) brain pathology after head impact -- even in the absence of signs of concussion. Early indicators of CTE pathology not only persisted long after injury but also spread through the brain, providing the best evidence to date that head impact, not concussion, causes CTE.
Brain protein changes could explain how concussions affect patients
Traumatic brain injuries, whether suffered from a blow on the football field or the battle field, can be devastating, leading to disability and shortened lives. However, little is known about how different levels of injury and time affect the brain, hindering efforts to develop effective treatments. Scientists now report results from rodent studies showing that signaling molecules are likely involved in mild cases, also known as concussions.
Former elite athletes live longer than their brothers
On average, former elite athletes survive longer than their brothers. In addition, their self-rated health and health-related habits are better in comparison to their brothers at an older age. The study included in total 900 former elite athletes and their brothers.
Cycling does not damage men's sexual or urinary functions
Cycling is increasingly popular for transportation, exercise, and leisure, and its impact on sexual health has received a great deal of media attention, especially regarding erectile function. Researchers have now found that contrary to some previous studies, neither recreational nor intense cycling appear to have a negative impact on men's sexual and urinary function.
Correct warm-up reduces soccer injuries in children by half
A warm-up program developed specially for children reduces soccer injuries by around 50 percent. A total of 243 teams comprising around 3,900 children from four European countries took part in the study.
Large increase in non-powder gun-related eye injuries
A study investigated sports- and recreation-related eye injuries during a 23-year period and found a slight decrease in eye injuries overall; however, the rate of eye injury associated with non-powder guns (including BB, pellet and paintball guns) increased by almost 170 percent.
Study uncovers potential key to preventing back pain in runners
A new study examines what may cause chronic back pain in runners and the exercises to help prevent it. The study suggests that runners with weak deep core muscles are at higher risk of developing low back pain. And, unfortunately, most people's deep core muscles aren't nearly as strong as they should be.