Sports Medicine News


Sports Medicine News


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Sports Medicine / Fitness News From Medical News Today
Sports medicine bridges the gap between science and practice in the promotion of exercise and health, and in the scientific assessment, study and understanding of sports performance. Sports medicine covers subjects such as sports injury prevention and treatment, exercise for health, drugs in sport, recommendations for training and nutrition and maximizing peak performance and exercise physiology.

Moving every 30 minutes may help you live longer
Prolonged sitting may raise the risk of early death, but new research suggests that this risk could be offset by getting up and moving every half an hour.
Ten common knee injuries and treatment
The knee is one of the body's more complicated joints and is susceptible to various injuries. Here are ten of the most common knee injuries.
Ledderhose disease: Treatments, diet, and surgery
What is ledderhose disease? What are the symptoms, what are the causes, does diet play a role in the condition and how is it diagnosed?
Exercise may alter men's food choices, but not women's
How does exercise influence diet? According to the results of a new study, the answer may depend on whether you are a man or a woman.
How do muscles work?
Find out how muscles move, how they repair themselves after injury, and why scientists say that antioxidants after exercise might not be good after all.
Boxer's fracture: Treatment, diagnosis, and recovery
A boxer's fracture is a bone fracture that affects knuckles in the hand. In this article, learn about the causes, how it is diagnosed, and treatments.
Dog walkers motivated by happiness, not health
It appears to be a case of 'do what makes you happy' for people who regularly walk their dogs.
How to lose subcutaneous fat: All you need to know
What is subcutaneous fat? In this article, we look at the health impact of subcutaneous fat, what causes it, and how to lose it through exercises and diet.
What is a spiral fracture? Causes and treatment
A spiral fracture is a type of bone fracture. It occurs when a long bone is twisted with force. Learn about the potential symptoms, and how it is treated.
Prolonged sitting and TV watching 'dangerous' for seniors
Insufficient physical activity, combined with excessive TV watching and sedentary behavior, dramatically raises the risk of walking disability in seniors.
Anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit muscle growth
The long-term use of over-the-counter (OTC) anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit muscle growth in young, healthy individuals engaging in weight training, according to a new study from Karolinska...
Dancing may help to combat brain aging
Researchers have found that both strength-endurance training and dancing increased hippocampal volume in the brain, but the latter had the greatest impact.
Brain recovery longer than clinical recovery among athletes following concuss...
University athletes with a recent concussion had changes in their brain structure and function even after they received medical clearance to return to play, a new study has found.
Exercise right after learning improves memory in women
New research suggests that as little as 5 minutes of light exercise immediately after a learning session improves memory in women.
How long does it take to build muscle with exercise?
Performing particular exercises and eating the right foods can help to build muscle over time. In this article, we look at the how long it will take.

Sports Medicine News -- ScienceDaily
Sports medicine. Read the latest research on competitive and recreational sports, including information on the occurrence and treatment of sports injuries.

Human growth hormone treatment after ACL injury may prevent loss of muscle st...
A new study finds the use of HGH treatment in patients that have undergone ACL reconstructive surgery may prevent the loss of muscle strength and weakness.
New hope for ACL injuries: Adding eccentric exercises could improve physical ...
People with anterior cruciate ligament injuries can lose up to 40% of the muscle strength in the affected leg -- with muscle atrophy remaining a big problem even after ACL reconstruction and physical therapy.
Football offensive linemen should start plays upright to avoid hits to the head
Just a simple change to the starting stance of players on the offensive line in American football could significantly reduce hits to the head, a new study now shows.
How exercise supports your mental fitness: Current recommendations
Sporting activities can bring about a long-term improvement in cognitive performance across all age groups. However, the effects differ between men and women, and not all sports provide the same impact. Researchers have provided recommendations based on a comprehensive analysis of previous studies.
Synthetic scaffolds to heal injured tendons and ligaments
Top biomedical engineering researcher develops synthetic scaffolds for tendon and ligament regeneration. Previous synthetic tendon grafts have led to poor outcomes and implant rejection. Australia has one of the highest rates of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in the world -- and up to 25 percent of surgeries require revision.
Consuming extra calories can help exercising women avoid menstrual disorders
Exercising women who struggle to consume enough calories and have menstrual disorders can simply increase their food intake to recover their menstrual cycle, according to a new study.
Researchers reverse muscle fibrosis from overuse injury in animals, hope for ...
High-force, high-repetition movements create microinjuries in muscle fibers. Muscle tissue responds by making repairs. But over time, with repetition of injury, healing capacity becomes overwhelmed, and microinjuries progress to fibrosis. Fibrosis weakens muscles and can put pressure on nerves, causing pain. Long thought to be irreversible, new research shows for the first time in animals that it may be possible to undo fibrotic damage and restore muscle strength.
Engineers find ankle exoskeleton aids running
Researchers find that a motorized device that attaches around the ankle and foot can drastically reduce the energy cost of running.
Many sport students reach the limits of their physical ability, but prefer no...
They are young and well-trained - but a fourth of sport science students suffers from pain in combination with psychosocial stresses.
Athletes who play indoor sports at risk of vitamin D deficiency
A new study assesses vitamin D status and supplementation of college athletes. Researchers found that the majority of athletes were vitamin D insufficient and a daily vitamin D supplement of 10,000 IU improved their status.
Why runner's addiction is adding to your injury woes
Each week, millions of runners around the world lace up their running shoes, spurred on by the psychological, health and social benefits that running delivers. But new research reveals a downside.
Kids eat more calories in post-game snacks than they burn during the game
A new study by public health researchers finds the number of calories kids consume from post-game snacks far exceeds the number of calories they actually burn playing in the game.
Slow, steady increase in exercise intensity is best for heart health
For the vast majority of people, the benefits of physical exercise outweigh the risks. However, for those who have inadequate training or who have underlying heart problems that may not have been detected, the risks of heart issues from extreme exercise, such as participation in marathons and triathlons, are increased.
Electrolyte supplements don't prevent illness in athletes
Electrolyte supplements popular with endurance runners can't be relied on to keep essential sodium levels in balance, according to researchers.
For 'blade runners' taller doesn't necessarily mean faster
The governing body for the Paralympics recently lowered the allowable height for sprinters who use prosthetic legs, or blades, during competition. The rules are based on the assumption that the taller you are the faster you run. But a new study has found otherwise.