Sports Medicine News


Sports Medicine News


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Sports Medicine / Fitness News From Medical News Today
Sports medicine bridges the gap between science and practice in the promotion of exercise and health, and in the scientific assessment, study and understanding of sports performance. Sports medicine covers subjects such as sports injury prevention and treatment, exercise for health, drugs in sport, recommendations for training and nutrition and maximizing peak performance and exercise physiology.

Moving every 30 minutes may help you live longer
Prolonged sitting may raise the risk of early death, but new research suggests that this risk could be offset by getting up and moving every half an hour.
Ten common knee injuries and treatment
The knee is one of the body's more complicated joints and is susceptible to various injuries. Here are ten of the most common knee injuries.
Ledderhose disease: Treatments, diet, and surgery
What is ledderhose disease? What are the symptoms, what are the causes, does diet play a role in the condition and how is it diagnosed?
Exercise may alter men's food choices, but not women's
How does exercise influence diet? According to the results of a new study, the answer may depend on whether you are a man or a woman.
How do muscles work?
Find out how muscles move, how they repair themselves after injury, and why scientists say that antioxidants after exercise might not be good after all.
Boxer's fracture: Treatment, diagnosis, and recovery
A boxer's fracture is a bone fracture that affects knuckles in the hand. In this article, learn about the causes, how it is diagnosed, and treatments.
Dog walkers motivated by happiness, not health
It appears to be a case of 'do what makes you happy' for people who regularly walk their dogs.
How to lose subcutaneous fat: All you need to know
What is subcutaneous fat? In this article, we look at the health impact of subcutaneous fat, what causes it, and how to lose it through exercises and diet.
What is a spiral fracture? Causes and treatment
A spiral fracture is a type of bone fracture. It occurs when a long bone is twisted with force. Learn about the potential symptoms, and how it is treated.
Prolonged sitting and TV watching 'dangerous' for seniors
Insufficient physical activity, combined with excessive TV watching and sedentary behavior, dramatically raises the risk of walking disability in seniors.
Anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit muscle growth
The long-term use of over-the-counter (OTC) anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit muscle growth in young, healthy individuals engaging in weight training, according to a new study from Karolinska...
Dancing may help to combat brain aging
Researchers have found that both strength-endurance training and dancing increased hippocampal volume in the brain, but the latter had the greatest impact.
Brain recovery longer than clinical recovery among athletes following concuss...
University athletes with a recent concussion had changes in their brain structure and function even after they received medical clearance to return to play, a new study has found.
Exercise right after learning improves memory in women
New research suggests that as little as 5 minutes of light exercise immediately after a learning session improves memory in women.
How long does it take to build muscle with exercise?
Performing particular exercises and eating the right foods can help to build muscle over time. In this article, we look at the how long it will take.

Sports Medicine News -- ScienceDaily
Sports medicine. Read the latest research on competitive and recreational sports, including information on the occurrence and treatment of sports injuries.

Participating in sports during childhood may have long-term benefits for bone...
Participation in organized sport during childhood and adolescence is associated with bone mass at 20 years of age.
Top athletes weigh in on perceived effectiveness of anti-doping measures
Doping remains an ongoing problem in competitive sports, but researchers have never before asked athletes to rank the effectiveness of available anti-doping strategies. A new poll of a national pool of top German cyclists and field athletes finds that, according to the athletes, better diagnostics, increased bans and laws against doping are perceived as far more effective than increased fines or leniency programs.
Neck device shows promise in protecting the brain of female soccer players
A new study of female high school soccer players suggests that a neck collar may help protect the brain from head impacts over the course of a competitive soccer season.
Cumulative sub-concussive impacts in a single season of youth football
In an investigation of head impact burden and change in neurocognitive function during a season of youth football, researchers find that sub-concussive impacts are not correlated with worsening performance in neurocognitive function.
How can we reduce concussions in football? Change kickoffs, experts say
A new study points to one way to make American football safer: move the kickoff line.
Creating 3-D-printed 'motion sculptures' from 2-D videos
A new system uses an algorithm that can take 2-D videos and turn them into 3-D printed 'motion sculptures' that show how a human body moves through space.
Long-term success of ACL reconstruction is connected to way you move post-sur...
Researchers conducted a study to observe walking biomechanics of 130 subjects who have had ACL reconstruction surgery. They found people who report lingering symptoms post-surgery either underload their injured leg (6-12 months after surgery) or overload the injured leg (after the 24-month mark), as compared to those who have had the surgery but no longer report symptoms.
Researchers find children experience concussion symptoms three times longer t...
Parents should be aware that significant changes in concussion treatment have emerged in recent years. Primarily, there has been a major shift to promoting active recovery -- including a quick return to social, academic, and athletic activities, as well as specialized rehabilitation. Also important is an understanding that children take three times longer than adults to recover from concussion symptoms -- sometimes even longer due to underlying anxiety or depression issues.
Inhaled steroids may increase risk of nontuberculous mycobacteria lung infect...
Patients using inhaled steroids to control asthma and other breathing problems may be at greater risk for developing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) lung infections, according to new research.
Emotional scars increase the risk of sports injury
Active top-flight athletes who have experienced sexual or physical abuse at some time in their life run a greater risk of sports-related injury. A new study has shown an association between lifetime abuse experience and injury risk in female athletes.
Public health researchers warn of dietary supplements containing higenamine
A new peer-reviewed study of weight-loss and sports/energy supplements containing higenamine finds unpredictable and inaccurately labeled dosages of the potentially harmful cardiovascular stimulant.
Body clock link to steroids discovered
Scientists have discovered that the time of day influences the way mice respond to steroids. Researchers found that out of 752 genes which regulate lungs in mice, 230 genes work only in the day and 197 only at night.
Concussions loosen insulation around brain cells
Detailed scans of concussed hockey players found that the protective fatty tissue surrounding brain cell fibers was loosened two weeks after the injury -- even though the athletes felt fine and were deemed ready to return to the ice. A loosening of that insulation, called myelin, slows the transmission of electrical signals between neurons, and shows that passing a concussion test may not be a reliable indicator of whether the brain has truly healed.
Even the fittest middle-aged athletes can't outrun cardiovascular risk factors
Middle-aged adults are exercising more and living longer, but new research suggests that even the fittest among them are not immune to cardiovascular disease -- and they often don't have any symptoms.
Tight-knit teammates may conform to each other's behavior
In a study with NCAA athletes, researchers found that the more closely a player identified as being part of their team, the more likely they were to conform to their teammates' behavior. This was true for both risky and positive behaviors.