Sports Medicine News


Sports Medicine News


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Sports Medicine / Fitness News From Medical News Today
Sports medicine bridges the gap between science and practice in the promotion of exercise and health, and in the scientific assessment, study and understanding of sports performance. Sports medicine covers subjects such as sports injury prevention and treatment, exercise for health, drugs in sport, recommendations for training and nutrition and maximizing peak performance and exercise physiology.

Moving every 30 minutes may help you live longer
Prolonged sitting may raise the risk of early death, but new research suggests that this risk could be offset by getting up and moving every half an hour.
Ten common knee injuries and treatment
The knee is one of the body's more complicated joints and is susceptible to various injuries. Here are ten of the most common knee injuries.
Ledderhose disease: Treatments, diet, and surgery
What is ledderhose disease? What are the symptoms, what are the causes, does diet play a role in the condition and how is it diagnosed?
Exercise may alter men's food choices, but not women's
How does exercise influence diet? According to the results of a new study, the answer may depend on whether you are a man or a woman.
How do muscles work?
Find out how muscles move, how they repair themselves after injury, and why scientists say that antioxidants after exercise might not be good after all.
Boxer's fracture: Treatment, diagnosis, and recovery
A boxer's fracture is a bone fracture that affects knuckles in the hand. In this article, learn about the causes, how it is diagnosed, and treatments.
Dog walkers motivated by happiness, not health
It appears to be a case of 'do what makes you happy' for people who regularly walk their dogs.
How to lose subcutaneous fat: All you need to know
What is subcutaneous fat? In this article, we look at the health impact of subcutaneous fat, what causes it, and how to lose it through exercises and diet.
What is a spiral fracture? Causes and treatment
A spiral fracture is a type of bone fracture. It occurs when a long bone is twisted with force. Learn about the potential symptoms, and how it is treated.
Prolonged sitting and TV watching 'dangerous' for seniors
Insufficient physical activity, combined with excessive TV watching and sedentary behavior, dramatically raises the risk of walking disability in seniors.
Anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit muscle growth
The long-term use of over-the-counter (OTC) anti-inflammatory drugs can inhibit muscle growth in young, healthy individuals engaging in weight training, according to a new study from Karolinska...
Dancing may help to combat brain aging
Researchers have found that both strength-endurance training and dancing increased hippocampal volume in the brain, but the latter had the greatest impact.
Brain recovery longer than clinical recovery among athletes following concuss...
University athletes with a recent concussion had changes in their brain structure and function even after they received medical clearance to return to play, a new study has found.
Exercise right after learning improves memory in women
New research suggests that as little as 5 minutes of light exercise immediately after a learning session improves memory in women.
How long does it take to build muscle with exercise?
Performing particular exercises and eating the right foods can help to build muscle over time. In this article, we look at the how long it will take.

Sports Medicine News -- ScienceDaily
Sports medicine. Read the latest research on competitive and recreational sports, including information on the occurrence and treatment of sports injuries.

Stress fracture? Your foot hitting pavement wasn't the main problem
It starts as a persistent and irritating pain in the foot or lower leg, then it gets more intense, maybe with swelling, and soon a runner knows she's being sidelined by one of the most common running injuries: a stress fracture. These tiny cracks in the bone can halt training for months or even end a sports season. A segment of the multibillion-dollar wearables industry aims to save potential victims from this fate, but an engineering professor found a major problem: the devices are measuring the wrong thing.
Athletes should build neck strength to reduce concussion risk, researchers re...
Researchers have proposed a way to mitigate risk for football and soccer players and others at risk of concussion: Protect your head with neck-strengthening exercises in the pre-season. New research examines previous studies on the role that the neck's strength, size and posture play in reducing concussion risk.
Quality of life in adolescents recovering from sports-related concussion or f...
Researchers studied health-related quality of life in adolescents with sports-related concussion or extremity fracture during their recovery periods.
Reducing head impacts in youth football
The high head impact and concussion rates in football are of increasing concern, especially for younger players. Recent research has shown that limiting contact in football practice can reduce the number of head impacts. But what is the correct formula to lessen exposure while still developing the skills necessary to safely play the game?
Understanding repetitive head impacts in sports
A new study has found that eyeball and eyelid movement, or oculomotor function, which is used to detect symptomless brain injury, can be impaired by mild, repetitive head impacts in football players. But the function may adapt mid-season, even as athletes continue to incur head impacts.
Performance enhancer: Sports compression stockings a winning advantage
Sports compression stockings are so effective they might be considered performance enhancers for soccer players, new research finds.
Lasting impact of concussions on young adults
Researchers have found that young adults who experienced repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), or concussions, can experience persistent cognitive changes as well as altered brain activity.
MRI technique shows unique signatures of concussion in rugby players
The research team studied the brains of young female athletes and used a technique that combined multiple brain imaging measures to be able to look at structural and functional information at the same time. The result was a much more sensitive and complete picture of concussion injury.
Physical activity in the evening does not cause sleep problems
Contrary to popular belief, there is no reason to avoid exercising in the evening, an analysis of the scientific literature has revealed.
Running a marathon can increase cardiac strain in amateur runners
Amateurs running full-length marathons could be significantly raising levels of several key biomarkers of cardiac strain. Levels of two proteins -- troponin I and troponin T -- were highest after runners completed a full marathon compared to a half marathon, and a 10K race, as were other biomarkers of cardiac stress.
Youth football changes nerve fibers in brain
MRI scans show that repetitive blows to the head result in brain changes among youth football players, according to a new study.
Playing youth football could affect brain development
Young football players may experience a disruption in brain development after a single season of the sport, according to a new study.
Anabolic steroids linked to higher rates of premature death in men
Men who use androgenic anabolic steroids -- such as testosterone -- may face a higher risk of early death and of experiencing more hospital admissions, according to a new study.
Playing high school football changes the teenage brain
A single season of high school football may cause microscopic changes in the structure of the brain, according to a new study. A new type of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed significant changes in the structure of the grey matter in the front and rear of the brain and changes to structures deep inside the brain.
Weightlifting is good for your heart and it doesn't take much
Lifting weights for less than an hour a week may reduce your risk for a heart attack or stroke by 40 to 70 percent, according to a new study. Spending more than an hour in the weight room did not yield any additional benefit, the researchers found. The results show benefits of strength training are independent of running, walking or other aerobic activity.